History of Our School

Church of England Schools in Ealing

Christ Church

The Origins

Christ Church was founded in 1872 as a parish school to provide Christian education for boys of the new parish of Christ Church Ealing by the Vicar of the parish, the Rev Joseph Hillyard (whose memorial is in the churchyard).  The field occupied by church and school had been bought at a cost of £200 in 1850.  He campaigned tirelessly to promote Church Schools and to raise the funds necessary to establish schools in his parish.   Ealing was growing very quickly and there were many working families in the parish who were without the means of basic education for their children. The present school hall with the buildings at each end are the original buildings.

In 1886 a companion school for girls was opened on the same site.  The two were combined in 1926, although there were separate playgrounds and boys and girls sat on separate sides of the church until within living memory.  In due course, and in accordance with various Education Acts, the school became designated as a ‘Voluntary Aided Church of England School’ managed by the Vicar and Foundation and Non-foundation governors.  In this respect, not much has changed since 1872.

Expansion

Shortly after the Second World War a prefabricated classroom was erected in the churchyard to provide for more children.  Classes often had sixty pupils with one teacher.  This building was abandoned in the 1960s (and then used as the church hall until its demolition in 2001).  Every ten years or so since the Second World War a new block of classrooms was added.  The last was the hexagonal building which was blessed by the Archdeacon Middlesex in 1997.  In 1991 the old vicarage garden, “the orchard”, was leased to the school as extra play space.  In 2005 the Bishop of London visited the school to bless the refurbished hall.  At this time the original entrance was restored and came back into use.  Ever since then, parents have donated generously to the school and beautified it and extended it for successive generations.  Today there are grandparents and parents who were once pupils at our school themselves.  

Changing Times

In 1951 the new parish of Christ the Saviour was created out of the two former parishes of Christ Church and St Saviour’s Ealing.  Christ Church was designated as a Middle School. It shared a Governing Body with St Saviour’s, the Infant School.  In 1993 the Governing Body was split into two separate bodies. In the same year the school was enlarged from two-and-a-half to three form entry (ninety children in each year) and became a Junior School in accordance with changes made throughout the Borough of Ealing.

Our Heritage

During its existence the school has had sixteen Head Teachers.  It has retained a special place in the memories and affections of former pupils who have gone on to various secondary schools and a wide range of careers in adulthood.  Many remember the school motto ‘Pro Deo et Ecclesia/For God and the Church’ which has been repeated by the whole school in assemblies throughout its history.  Since its foundation the school has played a rich and beneficial role in providing education grounded in the Christian Faith for children in the parish of Christ Church and then Christ the Saviour and in the Deanery of Ealing East.

St Saviour’s

The oldest part of St Saviour’s is dated 1864 during the incumbency of the Rev Joseph Hillyard, vicar of Christ Church Ealing.  He campaigned tirelessly to promote Church Schools and to raise the funds necessary to establish schools in his parish.  The building of 1864 was originally a large hall.  


In due course St Saviour’s mission church was built on land adjacent to the school.  In 1895 the permanent church of St Saviour’s was opened.  The Clergy House was completed in 1910.  School, Church and House shared the site in the Grove.  In 1916 St Saviour’s became an independent parish with school and Clergy House attached to the Church.  The church was destroyed by enemy action in 1940.  The school was left intact.  In 1951 it was decided not to rebuild the church.  The land on which it stood was transferred to the school and became the site of a large new playground and of the present school hall which was opened in 1962.  A cross set in the surface of the playground marks the site of the high altar of the church.


In due course in accordance with various Education Acts the school became designated as a ‘Voluntary Aided Church of England School’ managed by the Vicar of St Saviour’s and Foundation and Non-foundation governors.


Also in 1951 the parishes of Christ Church and St Saviour’s were united with Christ Church, renamed Christ the Saviour, as the parish church.  The school became St Saviour’s Voluntary Aided Church of England First School in the new parish. It shared a Governing Body with St Christ Church, the Middle School.  In 1993 the Governing Body was split into two separate bodies. In the same year the school was enlarged from two-and-a-half to three form entry (ninety children in each year) and became an Infant School in accordance with changes made throughout the Borough of Ealing.  Most pupils have gone on to Christ Church.

After a long period of fund-raising by the parents the school was substantially remodelled.   A new block was built to house three reception classes.  A reception suite was installed with an entrance at the end of the front playground.  A much larger staff room was made out of a former class-room.  A nursery for fifty children, twenty-five children in the morning and twenty-five in the afternoon, was built.  This was able to be completed due to a generous donation by the School Trustees.  Temporary huts in the playground were removed. An area was designated for staff parking and the grounds were imaginatively planted with trees and shrubs.  A nature area, with trees and a pond, was set aside at the far end of the back playground.  The new work was blessed by the Bishop of London in 1996.

The school has benefited from the sense of space and light within the buildings.  This has helped it develop an inspiring and peaceful atmosphere conducive to Infant education.


For many years mass has been celebrated each Thursday in the school hall and has been at the heart of the school’s continuous tradition of distinctive Anglo-Catholic Christian worship and teaching.